Category: Psychology

Expert WitnessPsychologyUncategorized

NFL investigating Panthers for possible breach of concussion protocol

According to this article on Yahoo, the NFL and the NFL Players Association have opened an investigation into whether the Carolina Panthers violated the concussion protocol for quarterback Cam Newton on Sunday.

This armchair pundit can tell you in watching the replay, Mr. Newton took a pretty solid hit to the head. Thereafter, in walking towards the sideline he fell to his knees. According to Yahoo, Cam Newton only missed one play. You may have wondered, as I did, what is the NFL’s concussion protocol. For that I turned to SBNation.com where they lay out the protocol as follows:

  1. When a potential concussion is identified the player shall be removed immediately from the field.
  2. The NFL team physician and the unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant (UNC) will:
    • Review the video of the play
    • Perform a focused neurological examination
  3. Madden Rule: If there is suspicion of a concussion, the player will be escorted to the locker room for a full assessment
  4. If the player is diagnosed with a concussion, there is NO same-day return to play
  5. If the player passes the exam, he will be monitored for systems throughout the game.

As we witnessed on Sunday, Cam Newton was only ushered to the blue medical tent and then back to the bench. We have to assume the team physician and the unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant did their due diligence to protect him from further harm. Mr. Newton claimed after the game there was a problem with his eye rather than a head injury. I’m of the mind that the human eye is a part of the head and further examination may be necessary. Then again, I am only playing a doctor in this piece.

Why am I concerned about this protocol and the possible failure to adhere to it? In the last 8 years I have seen the reports and talked to the expert witnesses who testify about traumatic brain injury and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The real doctors take it very seriously. The damage from CTE is immense and life altering.

I can tell you from my personal experience, the number of doctors specializing in TBI and CTE has at least doubled (probably tripled) in my time at Experts.com. They come in a wide range of medical specialties:

My concern is the medical professionals do what is right for Cam Newton, even if he is only interested in getting back to the game.

With all this said, I want to invite a couple of my friends, both lawyers and former college football players, to respond on this topic in their own time and on their own blogs.

So, to Bernard Nomberg of Nomberg Law Firm and Morris Lilienthal of Martinson & Beason, what say you? Did the Panthers fail to follow protocol? Does the protocol need to change?

UPDATE: January 12, 2018

We asked for input from the lawyers mentioned above. We have received both of their responses in blog posts!

From Morris Lilienthal – Protecting Players: Following Concussion Protocol is a Must.

From Bernard Nomberg – Big Hit on Cam Newton Calls into Question NFL Concussion Protocol.

 

Psychology

Mistrial Due to Expert Witness Testimony

A Stamford, CT judge declared a mistrial yesterday in the sexual assault case of a minor by police officer, Anthony Santo. Attorney for Santo, Gary Mastronardi, filed a motion for a mistrial after testimony offered by Child Guidance Center ‘s Dr. Larry Rosenberg, was so prejudicial to Santo that, “even striking his testimony would not keep the jurors from considering it in their deliberations.”
Interestingly enough, in a case argued by Mastronardi earlier this year, Connecticut’s Supreme Court upheld an appellate court reversal of the conviction of a Fairfield man on felony risk of injury charges. The Supreme Court agreed that the trial court abused its discretion by allowing an Expert Witness to indirectly testify about the truthfulness of a complaint’s allegations.
In this case, Dr. Rosenberg, a Psychologist, testified that 93 percent to 95 percent of the children who alleged sexual abuse are being truthful. The other five to seven percent were found to be coached by a parent. As there was no divorce or custody dispute in this case,  the inference was too strong that the girl was a victim of sexual abuse. “He went too far,” said Mastronardi. “He improperly and inappropriately commented on the credibility of the witness….” Comerford admitted that an error had been made in allowing Rosenberg’s testimony on the percentages of truthful minor sex-abuse victims. As a result, substantial damage was done to the defendant’s case. “Essentially what he was saying was the woman was telling the truth,” Comerford said. Based on the Supreme Court’s earlier decision regarding the truthfulness of a complaint’s allegations, Comerford granted Mastronardi’s motion.

Psychology

Psychology of Negotiation

What is the best way to approach a legal opponent?  Some would say the old “adversarial”  attack is the most effective – to come out with fists flying.  In other words, YOUR agenda as the TKO.  From a psychological standpoint, a little sparring would better serve your purpose.

It is common in many sports to put yourself in the shoes of your opponent so that you can better anticipate their moves.  The same is true for legal negotiations.  According to Dr.  Kenneth J. Manges, PhD, a Forensic Psychology Expert, sometimes it is necessary to, “…Give your perspective a rest and invest yourself in opposing counsel’s position.”  In his article entitled,Psychologically Speaking©: Negotiation 101,” Dr. Manges goes on to say, …”Role playing your opponent will prepare you for their way of thinking, which will in turn get you thinking more clearly about how you have to counter what they have to offer.”

Read Dr. Manges’  Full Article

Dr. Kenneth J. Manges is a Vocational and Psychological Expert with over 30 years of experience. He is certified in Forensic Psychology, Emotional Trauma, Wage Loss, Disability, and Crisis Intervention and is recognized as an Expert in Post Traumatic Stress Disorder